Gaudeamus nominee Remy Siu: ‘I got fed up with the notion of being a composer’

On Wednesday 4 September the 69th Gaudeamus Music Week kicked off with W.A.L.L. that Aart Strootman composed for a self-designed 60-tone marimba, four percussionists and four guitarists. – He won the Gaudeamus Award in 2017. Before its première I moderated a pre concert talk with this year’s nominees. Remy Siu (1990) admitted having gotten fed up with being the typical composer, writing notes on paper that others have to interpret on the stage.

Instead, he prefers to collaborate with other artists, writing software for them to react and respond to. As with fellow nominee Scott Rubin, this makes each project a communal endeavour rather than an individual achievement.

For the Gaudeamus Award Siu submitted three works in his Foxconn Frequency series. ‘I had just finished Foxconn Frequency nr. 3 and the series spans my output for the last seven or so years. Thus it showcases how I eventually developed a focus on real-time game mechanics as a compositional tool, and also how I implement them.’

Each work was made some years apart with the Hong Kong Collective, in Siu’s studio in Vancouver. ‘I haven’t written a traditional score in many years because I am tired of the relationship between performer and composer implied by that process. Moreover some of my friends are very interesting performers but cannot read music, I work in a lot of interdisciplinary environments. Our studio is occupied by dancers, theatre people, music people, and new media artists.’

‘Since I work with friends, I try to find interesting ways for them to exist inside my works. The Foxconn Frequency originates in my relationship with people who perform them, cultivated over multiple years. My hope is for them to make real-time decisions on stage that are interesting. Also I hope they are present/have presence, and that there are some stakes in the performance. That’s one of the reasons I create these works with software/hardware, to reconfigure the “play-space”, as e.g. in Foxconn Frequency nr. 3.

The exhortation that Foxconn Frequency nr. 3 must be performed by ‘three visibly Chinese performers’ may evoke raised eyebrows. However, the pianists occasionally recite Chinese poetry, and Siu also winks at the lack of ethnic diversity in the classical music world. On another level he addresses the abominable working conditions in Chinese factories by setting his performers almost impossible tasks in a series of mini-games. These are projected live for the audience, to see if they succeed or fail.

While the keyboardists are playing, 3D-printers ‘portray’ their skills, translating these into a physical cube for each performer. This cube usually comes out quite warped, because they can’t fulfil all commands they get from the software. However, when no mistake whatsoever is made, a perfect cube will appear.

Siu: ‘This has never occurred yet, but who knows  the concert coming Friday will yield a flawless specimen after all.’

I interviewed the five nominees on 4 September in TivoliVredenburg. (Remy Siu is last, picture by Co Broerse).I  

About theaderks

Thea Derks is a Dutch music journalist, who studied musicology at Amsterdam University. She' specialized in contemporary music and always has an eye open for women composers. In 2014 she wrote the biography of Reinbert de Leeuw and in 2018 she published 'Een os op het dak: moderne muziek na 1900 in vogelvlucht'.
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1 Response to Gaudeamus nominee Remy Siu: ‘I got fed up with the notion of being a composer’

  1. Pingback: Whoever said modern music is humourless and cerebral? Kelley Sheehan wins Gaudeamus Award 2019 | Contemporary Classical – Thea Derks

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